Starting a New Hobby: Online Piano Lessons

Starting a New Hobby: Online Piano Lessons It’s a long road from developing an interest in music and learning to play it well. You may hear Claire de Lune and fall under its spell and decide that you must become a pianist, you must produce these sounds, you must be an instrument capable of creating […]

Starting a New Hobby: Online Piano Lessons

It’s a long road from developing an interest in music and learning to play it well. You may hear Claire de Lune and fall under its spell and decide that you must become a pianist, you must produce these sounds, you must be an instrument capable of creating beauty. But then you sit down on the bench, place your fingers on the keys, and can barely play chopsticks. This can be, for many novice musicians, a very defeating moment and many potential musicians just get off the bench and carry on with their lives. Getting through the novice stage is the most challenging part of developing a new hobby so remember throughout the process: If Claire de Lune gives you that much joy when someone else plays it, imagine the feeling when it flows from your brain, down your arms, out your fingers and out through the piano at which you sit.

So how to begin?

It is crucial when learning a new hobby or skill to know your own learning style. Do you learn best in a group setting or a solo setting? With a teacher or on your own? In public or at your home? At your own pace or at a pre-set pace as determined by professionals? What is your budget? Do you have an instrument at home or will you need access to one?

If you are a solo learner or shy, it may be a good idea to look into an electronic keyboard and a pre-set online or computer-based lesson set. This way you will have some privacy as you learn, you’ll be able to practice anywhere, and you won’t have the social aspect of learning in a group setting hindering your desire to go to lessons or your shyness in demonstrating novice skills among strangers. Many learners decide to start novice level on their own in this fashion and then moving to in-person group or solo lessons once they’ve found a comfort level with the instrument.

If you’re more of a social learner, you may want to look into some lessons in your community. Whether at a community college, a local recreation center, or a music lesson company, you’ll likely be able to find something in your community that can cater to your learning style and needs. Before enrolling in music lessons, you may want to meet the teacher, explore the space, ensure that it is conveniently located, and that you feel comfortable there. Any little excuse to skip a lesson will immediately hinder your progress, so you want to be sure that your life can sustain the lessons in which you enroll.

And finally, spend some time sitting at a piano, listening to the kind of music that lead you to this article in the first place. If the music still speaks to you and you find yourself intellectually or emotionally comfortable on the bench, learning to play the instrument is the logical next step. Run your fingers along the ivory keys, kick your legs under the bench and tap on the pedals, settle in for a few minutes and try to picture yourself in exactly this position for up to an hour every day. If it feels right, stick with it. If you feel bored, maybe piano isn’t for you. Go try this out with a violin or a pair of tap shoes!

Learning any new hobby can be challenging at first, so it’s important to have a firm idea in mind or on paper as to how your life will be better with a new skill. And finally, whether you decide in-person or online is your preferred learning method, the onus is on you to commit yourself, open yourself, and learn!